SELECTED SCRIBBLING

SELECTED SCRIBBLING

HIGHLIGHTS:

  • It’s Okay to Suck, Hazlitt (July 26, 2016). The case for doing things you’re terrible at
  • “Everything We Can’t Describe in Music, Hazlitt (April 16, 2016). Timbre—the terroir of sound—is crucial to how we hear music. An excerpt from Bad Singer: The Surprising Science of Tone Deafness and How We Hear Music
  • Klondike Creative Class, Maisonneuve (Winter, 2013). The gold rush is long gone, but a new generation of artists is stoking the myth of the Yukon
  • Face the Music, Maisonneuve (Spring, 2012). How can someone who passionately loves music also be a terrible singer? Tim Falconer takes up voice lessons—and discovers the surprising science of tone deafness

LATEST ADDITIONS:

BOOK EXCERPTS:

ARTS & CULTURE:

  • The Literary Turf of Jay McInerney, Hazlitt (June 5, 2017). About the time I met Jay McInerney and we talked about, among other things, Raymond Carver, crashing British sports cars and how the novel endures
  • You reveal something very personal about yourself when you sing, TVO.org (July 28, 2016). The crucial bonding that takes place when we sing together. An excerpt from Bad Singer
  • Why it took me nine years to finish Bad Singer, TVO.org (July 27, 2016). The idea for a book about learning to sing struck me in 2009; the book came out in 2016. Here’s what happened along the way
  • “Everything We Can’t Describe in Music” Hazlitt (April 16, 2016). Timbre—the terroir of sound—is crucial to how we hear music. An excerpt from Bad Singer
  • Legacy of a Legend, Ryerson Review of Journalism (November, 2014). This guest blog post is a tribute to Don Obe, a pioneer of literary Journalism in Canada—and someone I considered a friend and mentor
  • Klondike Creative Class, Maisonneuve (Winter, 2013). What’s the Klondike like more than a century after the Gold Rush? Like Leonard Cohen’s Greece, according to one filmmaker who lives there. How the coolest town in Canada created a thriving arts community
  • Face the Music, Maisonneuve (Spring, 2012). How can someone who passionately loves music also be a terrible singer? Tim Falconer takes up voice lessons—and discovers the surprising science of tone deafness
  • Boys Don’t Try, This Magazine (March-April, 2005). I tell the story of the book that changed my life in this essay about why many men don’t read fiction

CITIES:

PEOPLE:

POLITICS:

  • Like Father, Like Son, Maisonneuve blog (October 20, 2015). We associate “Passion over reason” with Pierre Trudeau, but it also describes the choice Canadians made when they elected Justin Trudeau
  • Vengeance is Ford’s, All Fired Up in the Big Smoke (July 17, 2011). A look at how getting even is more important than good policy for Toronto mayor Rob Ford
  • If Toronto’s Mayors were Maple Leafs, This first appeared as a guest post on All Fired Up in the Big Smoke (Sept. 9, 2010) during the municipal election. I updated it the following June after we’d all seen Rob Ford in office
  • How the politics of parking can defile a city, The Toronto Star (May 11, 2008). An excerpt from Drive: A Road Trip through Our Complicated Affair with the Automobile

SCIENCE:

  • “How Bad Singing Landed Me in an MRI Machine” The Scientist (March 1, 2017). One author’s journey through the science of his congenital amusia
  • “The Science of Why You Can’t Carry a Tune” Tonic (February 14, 2017). Singing requires a surprising amount of coordination. An excerpt from Bad Singer: The Surprising Science of Tone Deafness and How We Hear Music
  • “Everything We Can’t Describe in Music” Hazlitt (April 16, 2016). Timbre—the terroir of sound—is crucial to how we hear music. An excerpt from Bad Singer: The Surprising Science of Tone Deafness and How We Hear Music
  • The Dangerous Pride of the Innumerate Journalist, Ryerson Review of Journalism (February, 2015). “I suck at math–that’s why I went into journalism” is a line I’ve been hearing for decades, but in this guest blog post, I argue that journalism is no place for people who don’t like math or science
  • Face the Music,” Maisonneuve (Spring, 2012). How can someone who passionately loves music also be a terrible singer? Tim Falconer takes up voice lessons—and discovers the surprising science of tone deafness

SOCIETY:

THE YUKON:

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